Chickscope

EXPLORE
ROOSTS
SCHOOLS
SEARCH
HELP
NEXT UNIT NEXT PAGE UP CATEGORY PREVIOUS PAGE PREVIOUS UNIT

Standard Varieties of Chickens:

Langshans


Langshans are the smallest and most active of the Asiatic class. They are a practical fowl in more senses than one, and their prolific laying and excellent qualities make them a profitable fowl for the farmer and market poultryman. They are one of the oldest varieties of poultry and have always been held in popular esteem. The shape of Langshans is distinct from that of the Brahma or Cochin, and should not be confused with either of the last-named varieties. Fig. 16 shows the accepted contour of the Langshan, and a comparison with those shown on figs. 9 and 11 shows at a glance the characteristics of the Langshan as compared with the other Asiatics. Langshans have white flesh and dark legs, while the others are yellow skinned and yellow legged. The quality of the flesh of the Langshan is excellent, being fine grained, tender, and nicely flavored. As layers they rank among the best, averaging from twelve to thirteen dozen a year, and as winter layers they are to be recommended. The chicks are hardy and mature early. Langshans are good sitters and mothers, being of gentle disposition; they are easily kept in confinement or on free range. Being excellent foragers, they are ideal fowls for the farm, and will gather during the year a considerable proportion of their food.

FIG. 16. - Pair of Black Langshans.

The Langshan is a stylish, medium sized bird, not overgrown or gawky in appearance, of active nature, and lively disposition. Many confound the Black Langshan with the Black Cochin. This need not be, as the following comparison between the two varieties shows: The Black Cochin is square in shape, with heavy-looking neck and legs, plenty of fluff and leg feathering, cushion rising from middle of back to tail, tail short, small and almost concealed by cushion; neck, breast, cushion, and tail all represented by convex lines. Langshan head, small for size of body, comb medium sized, well up in front, and arch shaped; Cochin head larger than that of the Langshan and not so arched over the eye; comb smaller, low in front and almost straight on top of serrations. Langshan back, short and concave; that of the Cochin, medium length, slightly convex, and large convex cushion. Langshan fluff, moderate and close; that of the Cochin extremely full and loose. Langshan wings somewhat large and inclined downward, quite prominent at shoulders; the Cochin wings smaller and almost hidden by the fluffy plumage of cushion and fluff. Langshan breast full, deep, and carried well forward; Cochin breast not so full and deep, but broader. Langshan legs medium in length, small bone, long tapering toes, color of shank, bluish black showing pink between scales, which are nearly black; Cochin legs shorter, stouter, larger bone, toes shorter and stouter, color of shanks black or yellowish black.

There are two varieties of Langshans - the Black and the White. The Black in plumage of neck, back, saddle, sickles, a glossy metallic black, with greenish sheen; breast, primaries, secondaries, tail fluff, shank, and toe feathers, black. The under color is black or dark slate. The White Langshan is pure white throughout.

The standard weight of cocks for both varieties is 10 pounds (4.5 kg); hens, 7 pounds (3.2 kg); cockerels, 8 pounds (3.6 kg); and pullets, 6 pounds (2.7 kg).


FOR FURTHER READING...

The first two images come from the Oklahoma State University Department of Animal Science's Poultry Breeds pages. The third and fourth images are from the FeatherSite, "an on-line zoological garden of domestic poultry". The Langshan page at Oklahoma and the Langshans page at FeatherSite contain further information about this breed's history and more images of these fowl. Clicking on each image takes you to the page specifically about that particular variety.


Black Langshan White Langshans White Langshan Hen White Langshan Cockerel

Image Credits (from left to right): Copyright © 1996, Oklahoma State University Board of Regents; Copyright © 1996, Oklahoma State University Board of Regents; Courtesy of Donna West; Courtesy of Mark Davis

Please note: These links point to pages that are being served off of the Oklahoma State University's web server and off the cyborganic.net web server, which are not part of the Chickscope project. Because of this, the pages may be missing or corrupted, and control of this is generally out of the hands of the Chickscope development team.

- Page 11 of 47 -

NEXT UNIT NEXT PAGE UP CATEGORY PREVIOUS PAGE PREVIOUS UNIT
FROM EGG TO CHICK REFERENCES SOFTWARE STANDARD VARIETIES OF CHICKENS SELECTED WEBLINKS HOME Copyright (C) 1998 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign